Whether you are a beginner, or a passionate sailor, it is important to acquire a vocabulary of Sailing terms.

July 15, 2016

Your ultimate Terminology guide  and ABC for your Sailing Vacation.

 

 

Pirate talk and pirate slang have so many odd-sounding words, but that's part of why it's so fun.

 

Just try to say, Monkey Jacket, Poop deck, or Futtock Shrouds without a grin or a chuckle.

 

There's even an international day for everyone to talk like a pirate!

 

We choose for your infotainment a few of the more amusing & popular examples.

 

 

ANCHOR: Device designed to bring up mud & weed samples from the bottom.

 

BOTTOM PAINT: Paint found on a pair of pants after the cockpit seats are freshly painted.

 

BUOY: Navigational aid. There are several types and colors:

  • green can (seen as a fuzzy black spot on the horizon)

  • red nun (seen as a fuzzy black spot on the horizon)

  • red or green day beacon(seen as a fuzzy black spot on the horizon)

  • channel marker (seen as a fuzzy black spot on the horizon)

 

COMMAND: Confuse Obscure Mispronounce Mumble Abbreviate Nasalize Drool.

 

DINGHY: Ideally it should have sufficient stability to carry the entire crew at least 50 boat-lengths away from their vessel before foundering...

 

ETIQUETTE: Marine custom establishes a code of social behavior and nautical courtesy for every conceivable occasion. For example, a boat belonging to another boatman is always referred to as a "scow", a "tub", or a "pig-boat". When one skipper goes aboard another boat, he does not hesitate to tell him frankly about any drawbacks or disadvantages he finds in comparison to his own craft. Sailors welcome every opportunity to improve their vessels, and so he knows that his remarks will be greatly appreciated. When one Sailboat passes another, it is customary for the captain of the passing boat to make a bladderlike sound with his lips and tongue, and for the captain of the passed boat to return the courtesy by offering a smart salute consisting of a quick upward movement of the right hand with the second digit extended.

 

FIRST MATE: Crew member necessary for skippers to practice shouting instructions to.

 

GALLEY: This refers to the kitchen area in your yacht.

 

NAVIGATION: Sophisticated location method that enables sailors to instantly determine the exact latitude and longitude, within just a few feet, anywhere on the surface of the surface of the earth, of whatever it was they just ran aground on.

 

PRATIQUE: When passing through customs, particularly in the tropics - it is customary
to display a small amount of that country's official currency in a conspicuous place and to transfer it to the officer who examines the boat's documents during the parting handshake. Incidentally, these inspectors are justly proud of their educational attainments, and the savvy Sailboat owner can win some fast friends by remarking with surprise and admiration on their ability to read and write.

 

TRUE WIND: This refers to the Wind that you feel when the Sailboat is not moving.

 

WINCH: A thing you grind till it squeals or groans. Not to be confused with ‘wench’,
which has a similar definition.

 

YACHT CLUB: Troublesome seasonal accumulation in costal areas of unpleasant

marine organisms with stiff necks and clammy extremities. Often present in large

numbers during summer months when they clog inlets, bays, and coves, making

navigation almost impossible. They can be effectively dislodged with dynamite,

but, alas, archaic federal laws rule out this option.

 

ZEPHYR: Mythical Greek god of wishful thinking, false hopes, and unreliable forecasts.

 

 

International Talk Like a Pirate Day (ITLAPD, September 19) is a parodic holiday created in 1995 by John Baur (Ol' Chumbucket) and Mark Summers (Cap'n Slappy), of Albany, Oregon, U.S., who proclaimed September 19 each year as the day when everyone in the world should talk like a pirate.

 

 

 

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